Freedoms

The imaginary (or social imaginary) is the set of values, institutions, laws, and symbols common to a particular social group and the corresponding society through which people imagine their social whole. That's a mouthful.

In 1975, Cornelius Castoriadis used the term in his book The Imaginary Institution of Society, maintaining that 'the imaginary of the society … creates for each historical period its singular way of living, seeing and making its own existence'. For Castoriadis, the central imaginary significations of a society … are the laces which tie a society together and the forms which define what, for a given society, is “real”. Some sort of intersubjectively shared massive background consensus. And often used in social engineering strategies.

“The Four Freedoms” were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on Monday, January 6, 1941. In an address known as “The Four Freedoms Speech” (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people “everywhere in the world” ought to enjoy.

Franklin D. Roosevelt also called for “a world-wide reduction of armaments” as a goal for “the future days, which we seek to make secure” but one that was “attainable in our own time and generation.” More immediately, though, he called for a massive build-up of U.S. arms production:

Every realist knows that the democratic way of life is at this moment being directly assailed in every part of the world… The need of the moment is that our actions and our policy should be devoted primarily—almost exclusively—to meeting this foreign peril. …[T]he immediate need is a swift and driving increase in our armament production. …I also ask this Congress for authority and for funds sufficient to manufacture additional munitions and war supplies of many kinds, to be turned over to those nations which are now in actual war with aggressor nations. …Let us say to the democracies…

Virginia Satir keenly observed that many adults learned to deny certain senses from childhood, that is, to deny what they hear, see, taste, smell and touch/feel.

Noting the significant role our senses play in our survival, she devised the Five Freedoms tool, essentially affirmations, to help people connect to their body and self in the moment, and focus their attention on their inner resources and creative choices in the present. (Here we see how ahead of her time Satir was; these are mindfulness concepts proven today by neuroscience research.)